Rocky Mountain Foot &Ankle provides adult heel pain treatment to communities in both Ada County and Canyon County with offices in Meridian, Eagle, Nampa and Caldwell.
To find out more, make an appointment with one of our experienced, friendly, and board-certified foot doctors.  We accept most insurance plans as well as Medicare.

What are People Saying About Rocky Mountain Foot and Ankle?

“Love love love these guys! Not only was it professional but it was fun. The staff was like hanging out with friends. Very happy with Dr. Ericsson and his staff they were great and follow-up was excellent!” -Sandra F.

What causes adult heel pain?

Heel pain is quite common among adults, and it has several possible causes. While sometimes heel pain is caused by a body-wide illness- like gout or rheumatoid arthritis -it is usually a localized condition that affects the foot only.
The common, local causes of heel pain include:

  • Achilles tendonitisthis inflammation of the Achilles tendon is often triggered by overuse, especially in sports with excessive jumping like basketball. It can also come from shoes that fit poorly digging into the Achilles tendon on the back of the heel. Rarely, it is caused by inflammatory illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis or gout.
  • Bursitis- this is the inflammation of a bursa. A bursa is a sac that lines many joints and allows tendons and muscles to move easily when the joint is moving. Bursitis may cause pain at the underside or back of the heel. For some people, heel bursitis is related to structural problems of the foot that cause an abnormal gait. For others, shoes with poorly cushioned heels can trigger bursitis.
  • Heel spurthis is an abnormal growth of bone at the area where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel bone. It is caused by long-term strain on the plantar fascia and muscles of the foot, and is commonly found in obese people, runners or joggers. Heel spurs are often painless and are not usually the cause of heel pain even when seen on an X-ray. They may develop as a reaction to plantar fasciitis.
  • Local bruisesJust like other parts of the body, your heel can accidentally be bumped and bruised. The heel is most commonly bruised by stepping on a hard, sharp object while walking barefoot.
  • Plantar fasciitisthis is a painful inflammation of the plantar fascia, which a fibrous band of tissue on the sole of the foot that helps to support the arch. It occurs when the plantar facia is overstretched and/or overworked resulting in small tears in the fibers of the fascia- especially where the fascia meets the heel bone. Anyone can develop plantar fasciitis; however, it is exceptionally common in the following groups of people: pregnant women, people with diabetes, obese people, runners, volleyball players, and tennis players. People with flat feet have a higher risk of developing plantar fasciitis.
  • Pump bumpknown medically as posterior calcaneal exostosis, pump bump is an irregular bony growth at the back of the heel. It is particularly common in young women who wear pump shoes that put extra pressure on the foot/heel.
  • Trapped nervesometimes heel pain, numbness, or tingling is caused by the compression of a small nerve (a branch of the lateral plantar nerve). Often, this compression is related to a fracture, sprain, or varicose vein near the heel.

Heel Pain Symptoms

Heel pain symptoms present themselves in different ways depending on the cause.
The common, local causes of heel pain include:

  • Achilles tendonitis – this inflammation of the Achilles tendon is often triggered by overuse, especially in sports with excessive jumping like basketball. It can also come from shoes that fit poorly digging into the Achilles tendon on the back of the heel. Rarely, it is caused by inflammatory illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis or gout.
  • Bursitis- this is the inflammation of a bursa. A bursa is a sac that lines many joints and allows tendons and muscles to move easily when the joint is moving. Bursitis may cause pain at the underside or back of the heel. For some people, heel bursitis is related to structural problems of the foot that cause an abnormal gait. For others, shoes with poorly cushioned heels can trigger bursitis.
  • Heel spur- this is an abnormal growth of bone at the area where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel bone. It is caused by long-term strain on the plantar fascia and muscles of the foot, and is commonly found in obese people, runners or joggers. Heel spurs are often painless and are not usually the cause of heel pain even when seen on an X-ray. They may develop as a reaction to plantar fasciitis.
  • Local bruises- Just like other parts of the body, your heel can accidentally be bumped and bruised. The heel is most commonly bruised by stepping on a hard, sharp object while walking barefoot.
  • Plantar fasciitis- this is a painful inflammation of the plantar fascia, which a fibrous band of tissue on the sole of the foot that helps to support the arch. It occurs when the plantar facia is overstretched and/or overworked resulting in small tears in the fibers of the fascia- especially where the fascia meets the heel bone. Anyone can develop plantar fasciitis; however, it is exceptionally common in the following groups of people: pregnant women, people with diabetes, obese people, runners, volleyball players, and tennis players. People with flat feet have a higher risk of developing plantar fasciitis.
  • Pump bump- known medically as posterior calcaneal exostosis, pump bump is an irregular bony growth at the back of the heel. It is particularly common in young women who wear pump shoes that put extra pressure on the foot/heel.
  • Trapped nerve- sometimes heel pain, numbness, or tingling is caused by the compression of a small nerve (a branch of the lateral plantar nerve). Often, this compression is related to a fracture, sprain, or varicose vein near the heel.

Diagnosing the Cause of Your Heel Pain

When you visit Rocky Mountain Foot & Ankle with heel pain, your doctor will first ask you to describe your symptoms and ask you medical history and lifestyle questions. We will then do an examination including:

  • A thorough evaluation of your feet- First we may compare your feet for any differences between them. After which we will examine the painful foot for any signs of discoloration, muscle weakness, tenderness, swelling or a decreased range of motion.
  • An evaluation of your gait- While barefoot, we will have you stand still and walk to evaluate how your foot moves as you walk.
  • A neurological examination- If necessary, we may evaluate the nerves and muscles of your foot by checking strength, sensation and reflexes.
  • X-rays- The need for x-rays or other diagnostic tests will depend on the results of your physical examination.

*Treatment and recovery will vary based on your diagnosis.

If you’re experiencing heel pain, schedule an appointment with one of our friendly foot doctors. The podiatrists at Rocky Mountain Foot & Ankle will thoroughly examine your feet and evaluate your symptoms to better understand your condition. We will work with you to create a treatment plan that best fits your needs and puts an end to your pain.

Call (208) 855-5955 or request an appointment online.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This